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Ovarian Cancer

Health Innovation

Her Bright Future

This Women’s History Month, rather than looking back, we’re looking forward to the bright future we all deserve – one in which less lives are lost to breast and ovarian cancer, every young woman is empowered to know her risk and manage her health proactively, and women everywhere can live healthier, happier, longer lives.

Bright Pink is committed to serve as a tenacious champion for women as they journey toward these futures. And we’re proud to be amongst some of today’s most innovative women’s health leaders striving to meet the ever-changing needs of women as they navigate the shifting healthcare landscape.

We’ll feature other wonderful health innovators on our blog, through Instagram giveaways, and as a matching donor to our Facebook Fundraiser.

Together, we’ll secure Her Bright Future


Throughout March, we’ll introduce a wonderful health innovator who is working alongside Bright Pink to create Her Bright Future. First up? We’re teaming up with Modern Fertility: The fertility hormone test you can take at home. Get to know the power-duo behind the company, Afton Vechery & Carly Leahy.

  1. Tell us a bit about Modern Fertility and how your mission empowers women?
    We’re a women’s health company focused on making fertility information more accessible, earlier in life. We take the same fertility hormone tests offered in infertility clinics and make them available before your first (or next) kid. We plan out everything in our lives––our finances, our careers––but when it comes to fertility, we’re still expected to just “wait and see”––and in 2019, that’s just not good enough. Modern Fertility is putting the power of fertility knowledge directly into the hands of women, so they can be their own best advocates when it comes to decisions impacting their bodies and futures.
  2. How did the idea come about to create Modern Fertility?
    Our CEO and cofounder Afton Vechery decided she didn’t want to have kids until later in life, so she set out to better understand her fertility and start planning ahead. The process wasn’t easy: multiple appointments and procedures—plus a $1,500 bill that came in the mail when it was all done. Despite the painful process, she felt empowered by the information she uncovered, which allowed her to understand her body and take control of her roadmap. The experience spawned the idea for Modern Fertility. Afton was inspired to make this process dramatically easier and more accessible so more women could take the reins of their personal health.
  3. What differentiates Modern Fertility from more traditional fertility/ hormone testing?
    Traditional fertility testing takes place in infertility clinics, typically only after you’ve tried to conceive and are having problems. With less than 500 infertility clinics nationwide and costs reaching above $1,500, this traditional process is problematically constrained, not to mention, is designed to be reactive instead of proactive. Modern Fertility is the most comprehensive hormone test that you can take at home––helping women understand reproductive health early so they can make a decision accordingly.
  4. How does Modern Fertility prioritize women’s health? Everything we do is focused on bettering women’s health. Our internal motto is simply, “We trust women.” We believe that women deserve to understand and own their persona health information so they can be their own best health advocate and work with their doctors while staying in the driver’s seat––all to make the decisions that are right for them.
  5. Which #bossbabe inspires you the most? There are so many, but we love Michelle Obama for showing us you can be smart, sexy, motherly, feminine and goofy all in one go. Her memoir, Becoming, is a must-read. Must own.
  6. Your go-to Girl Power pump-up music is _______. When we first started the company we listened to Havana by Camila Cabello a lot. Like––a lot a lot.
  7. Favorite way to self-care and why? We both love to sweat. Our exercise of choice? Biking!
  8. Please describe how you envision Her Brighter Future. What does it look like? What opportunity exists? What equity is achieved? We see a world where fertility testing is as routine as a pap smear. And that’s just the beginning. We’re working toward a future where every woman has access to information about her body that will help her make informed decisions about her life.
Hey Sis

Introducing: Hey, sis

For over a decade, Bright Pink has encouraged all women to take a proactive approach to their breast and ovarian health. Though all people with breasts and ovaries face some cancer risk, these diseases do not affect all women in the same way. Black women are 42% more likely to die from breast cancer than white women, and in 2018, the American College of Radiology and the Society of Breast Imaging recommended that Black women be added to groups considered at higher-than-average risk for breast cancer.

Notoriously left out of the national women’s health conversation, Black women deserve more personalized content to drive behavior change and start to change these odds. Bright Pink is committed to connecting with and engaging this audience with intentionality and purpose in hopes of leveling the playing field related to personalized prevention. As such, we’re launching a campaign this February called “Hey, sis” focused on engaging young Black women in proactive health management. This year-round campaign will feature digital advertising, inspirational social content, storytelling on Bright Pink’s blog, influencer engagement, brand partnerships, and more.

To kick things off, we’ll set the stage by diving a bit deeper into risks Black women face specifically. Throughout the year we’ll share additional content under the “Hey, Sis” umbrella that features personal breast and ovarian health experiences from Black women, personalized health recommendations for the Black community, progress being made to address these barriers, and more. Join us, follow along, and spread the word – because we’re stronger when we all work together in pursuit of the bright future every woman deserves.


Health disparities between Black and white women in the US have existed for decades and were first recognized 30 years ago. Today, even though Black women are less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, they are still much more likely to die from the disease than their white counterparts. Black women are 42% more likely to die from breast cancer than white women. That’s a significant increase compared to 1990, when Black women were 17% more likely to die from breast cancer than white women.1

Why such a big difference? Overall, Black and white women develop breast cancer at similar rates, however, Black women tend to face much harder diagnoses. For one, they are are more likely to develop breast cancer before the age of 40. They also have higher rates of triple negative breast cancer, one of the most aggressive types of the disease. Though triple negative breast cancer only represents between 15 and 20 percent of all breast cancers,2 Black women are twice as likely to receive this diagnosis. In addition, women with triple-negative breast cancer are more likely to have a BRCA gene mutation, an inherited mutation3 that increases their risk of breast cancer between 69 and 72 percent in their lifetime and raises their risk for ovarian cancer to between 17 and  44 percent.4

Beyond their biological risk factors, Black women face multiple barriers in accessing prevention and early detection services because our healthcare system fails to provide women with appropriate information, integrate risk assessments into primary care, and provide risk identification and management services at an affordable cost. They have lower screening rates when compared to white women, causing doctors to detect their cancers at a later, more aggressive and life-threatening stage.

The treatment experience is also uniquely challenging for Black women, complicated by their tendency to experience more prominent scars post- surgery, and their potential to develop keloids and hypertrophic scarring in addition to hyperpigmentation. Not to mention, Black women have a complex and deeply personal relationship with their hair.

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At Bright Pink we believe that knowledge is power; that risk awareness can be the catalyst for women to access more frequent screening, pursue genetic testing, and access treatments not routinely recommended to the general population. These actions can greatly improve their chances of preventing cancer or detecting it in its most treatable stage.

We are not so naive as to think that we alone can solve this problem. But, by leaning into our strengths in digital content, innovation, and partnerships with the healthcare industry and beyond, we can certainly play a significant role in the solution. We’ll continue to ensure our resources speak to and meet the unique needs of Black women throughout the country, so that when presented with the opportunity to take control of their health, Black women feel heard, understood, and supported to do so. We’ll pursue new opportunities to welcome Black women into our community, to brighten up on their breast and ovarian health, assess their risk, explore their genetics, partner with their providers, and more.

Everyone deserves the opportunity to live a healthier life, no matter who they are.

Hey, sis, that includes you!

Community, Fueling our Mission, Personal Stories

The Somm and the Diva Mom

Seth is the Wine Director at Booth One, a Chicagoland bar and restaurant in the Gold Coast neighborhood. Throughout the month of September and October, Booth One is hosting a Happy Hour program benefitting Bright Pink. We sat down with Seth to ask him some questions about his philanthropic spirit and connection to Bright Pink.  

Tell us a little bit about the fundraiser you are hosting at Booth One. What should our community know?

Stop by Booth One (1301 N State Pkwy, Chicago) any Wednesday throughout September and October and you will be able to enjoy $5 bar bites like Crispy Halibut Tacos, plus $5 beers and a selection of $5 wines and bubbles. A portion of proceeds will be donated to Bright Pink to help educate our community on the importance of knowing your breast and ovarian cancer risk and managing that risk proactively. Cancer can be a difficult topic of conversation, but I want this event to be able to celebrate the strength we can build together and have some fun doing it. Like my mom used to say, “Life is difficult, but it’s so much more fun to laugh than to cry about it.”

Note: Bright Pink encourages you to drink responsibly! Research shows a 10% increase in breast cancer risk for each drink you have each day, so do your best to limit alcohol to no more than one drink per day.

What is your connection to Bright Pink?

Bright Pink was actually brought to my attention through a friend as a potential non-profit Booth One could endorse. As I did more research, I knew there could be a way to incorporate fundraising for Bright Pink into our wine program in addition to honoring my mother since Bright Pink’s work hits so close to me and my heart.

Why Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month? What significance does this have?

My mother passed away from ovarian cancer last October (2017). She endured an aggressive cancer that took her life only three short months after diagnosis. Throughout her treatment, we heard over and over about how sly ovarian cancer is and how difficult it can be to recognize the signs and symptoms before it’s too late.

I remember my mom’s doctor saying that we should all be looking at cancer more holistically and combat it before it’s able to go into full force. My experience has taught me the power of being knowledgeable about ovarian cancer risk and how to pay attention to the signs and symptoms. My mother also LOVED wine and helped foster my personal passion for it. It was during the opening of Booth One that she was diagnosed and I spent countless hours by her side while building our award-winning wine list, so our happy hour program is also a commemorative event to celebrate the influence she had on me and my success.

Assess Your Risk, Community, Early Detection, Personal Stories

“At 34, I was the epitome of a healthy young woman.”

Did you know? About 21,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with ovarian cancer every year, and of those, 14,000 die from it. That’s essentially ⅔ ratio. This year, I became one of those 21,000; however, I’m also incredibly lucky to be one of the fortunate ones who caught it before it was too late.

Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month is important to me because there is so much that we, as women, don’t know about our bodies and how we can be proactive about our health.

My Story

At 34, I was the epitome of a healthy young woman. I eat clean, don’t smoke, exercise regularly, and wear sunscreen. One day, I walked into the doctor’s office and found out I have cancer.

My journey started with a gut feeling. In recent years, I’d had a number of friends who had confided in me about their trouble conceiving and, as an unmarried woman in my early 30’s who desperately wants children one day, I decided to trust my instincts and look into freezing my eggs.

At my initial appointment, the doctors gave me an ultrasound which revealed a large ovarian cyst on my right ovary. The doctors assured me it was nothing, “99% chance it’s benign” but nonetheless, they recommended I have surgery to remove it so it wouldn’t rupture and cause more severe internal damage. I reluctantly agreed.

Surgery number one was scheduled in September. The plan was to have the cyst removed and then I could proceed with egg freezing; however, after surgery, I walked in to my follow up appointment for the biopsy results and got the news everyone dreads hearing.

On October 5, 2017 I was diagnosed with immature teratoma (stage 1) ovarian cancer. As the doctors explained to me, the initial cyst was benign; however, during surgery, they found another tumor that none of the scans had shown. That tumor was cancerous.

The next few weeks were a blur. I saw numerous doctors for second and even third opinions to understand what was going on in my body and what was the best course of action for my treatment. After reviewing all options, the treatment plan was outlined to have surgery to remove my right ovary and, as long as the cancer hadn’t spread, I wouldn’t have to proceed with chemotherapy.

I felt so many emotions during those weeks leading up to surgery. I wondered how on earth this was happening to me, why I didn’t know and what signs I missed. As someone who is extremely type A, I scoured my calendar for missed annual appointments or anything of that nature and I came up short. I had done everything right, it just didn’t make sense.

Going into surgery was one of the scariest days of my life. I believed in my heart that I would be ok but I still saw the fear in everyone’s faces when they learned my story. But I’m nothing if not a fighter so I forged ahead, trying to remember to be brave like all those other women who’ve been through this battle too.

Luckily, on Thanksgiving that year after surgery #2, I was given the news that I was cancer-free. This means I would be closely monitored for the next year but essentially, I had a clean bill of health and wouldn’t need additional treatment.

As I stand here today, it’s certainly not lost on me how fortunate I am to have caught this early. And, when Bright Pink approached me to write this piece, I’m reminded of something I heard once that really stuck with me: It’s not luck that changes your fate. Everyone in this world will have situations that are “lucky.” It’s what you do with that luck that has the power to change the world.

For me, that’s why Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month is so important. I’m standing here today not with any large life lesson or sign/symptom that I can share to save you or your loved ones from cancer. Instead, I’m joining Bright Pink and telling you to #ListenUp.

#ListenUp to your instincts. If you think something isn’t right, call your doctor. Who knows, it just may save your life. It saved mine.

MORGAN BELLOCK is a Public Relations professional living in the Chicago area. You can get in contact with Morgan at [email protected]

Assess Your Risk, Community, Early Detection, Personal Stories

“I took time to #ListenUp to my health. It made a huge difference.”

When I got a phone call from my Uncle Joe, a surgical breast oncologist, several years ago I had no idea that it would save my life. He called because he knew I had three aunts who had been diagnosed with cancer (one passed away from ovarian cancer at just 41 years of age, another after a long battle with breast cancer, and one who is a breast cancer survivor to this day) and encouraged me to see a genetic specialist to better understand my personal breast and ovarian cancer risk.

Before long, I entered a program that took a deep dive into my family history. While my test results came back negative for the most common genetic mutations associated with these cancers, the genetic specialist shared that my risk factor was greater than the average woman. Knowing this allowed me to have very important conversations with my doctors about early detection and prevention strategies.

Several years later, during a routine self-exam, I found a lump. I remember it all too well: I had just worked out and had 15 minutes for a quick shower before I needed to take my son to basketball practice. In fact, I can still remember looking at the clock in a typical rushed state. I recall telling myself that I was no good to him if I was not here, took those few extra minutes, and proceeded with my exam.

After several tests, the lump was diagnosed as stage one breast cancer. Because of the information I already knew about my family health history, I chose to undergo a double mastectomy and later, an oophorectomy. Understanding my level of risk allowed me to make informed decisions about my health.

As I continue my quest to share knowledge as a Bright Pink Education Ambassador, I cannot stress the importance of taking the time to #ListenUp to your health. As a woman, I know that the role of caretaker comes to me naturally, in addition to being a wife, employee, and volunteer. As women, we never forget to take our children to the dentist, or miss a deadline on a work project–but somehow in the midst of all of this, we often forget ourselves and our own health.

I can’t count the number of times I have heard from smart, educated women, that “breast and ovarian cancers don’t run in their family” or “they have not had a mammogram lately/skipped their annual well woman’s exam because they feel good.” When I hear these things, I explain that no one is exempt from these conversations and that taking the time to #ListenUp to our bodies and catch these cancers at early, non life threatening stages is so, so important.

Here are three things you can do today to help #ListenUp to your body:

  • Know the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer–they can be confused with common digestive or menstrual issues.
  • Plan all of your annual doctor appointments for a specific month. For me, February is “take care of me month.”  I make sure that I schedule all of my annual appointments during this time because it works best for my life and schedule.
  • Use the first day of every month to remind myself to be self-aware. This month (and every month!), #ListenUp to your ovarian health, take note of any changes in your body, and spend some time collecting your family health history.

We know that these cancers are prevalent and serious. But if caught early, the survival rate is amazing! The key is to be your own health and wellness advocate, because early detection and prevention can save your life.  It saved mine.

SUSAN EURITT is a Bright Pink Educational Ambassador living in Chicago, IL. She is the Principal at Ruckus Strategic Partnership Consulting.

Assess Your Risk, Community, Early Detection, Fueling our Mission, Personal Stories

“Mom, I #ListenUp Every Day to Honor You.”

Ovarian Cancer Awareness month is important to me because it provides me so many opportunities to honor my mother and raise awareness about a critical women’s health issue.

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic disease; but, when caught early, the 5 year survival rate is greater than 92%–a fact that resonates with me deeply because it is highlighted through my mother’s story. As her story will show you, our ovaries talk to us and let us know if something is wrong; it’s important to #ListenUp to your body and pay attention to your health.

My Mother’s Story

In 2009, my mother was the epitome of good health and an active 53 year-old woman. Prior to her diagnosis, she had multiple, complex ovarian cysts that her doctor monitored every three months. When I reflect back on her journey, I can now see that she experienced some of the symptoms of ovarian cancer that were misdiagnosed by doctors. I know now that this is common for other women as well, as the signs and symptoms of the disease are so vague and can be confused with other conditions and diseases.

A few months later, her doctor decided it would be best to remove her ovaries and scheduled her for routine, outpatient surgery — a bilateral salpino-oopherectomy. We were told she’d be able to go home that day after she recovered.

When she awoke from surgery, she learned about her Stage 1C ovarian cancer diagnosis from my dad. She and our entire family were devastated by this news. Once the doctors saw that it was cancer, she had a more invasive surgery, a 1-week hospital stay, followed by 6 cycles of chemotherapy. As a result, mom achieved a 2.5-year remission!

In March 2012, during a follow-up exam, her doctor discovered that the cancer recurred. My mom and our entire family were heartbroken. We knew she had a long road to recovery ahead. During this time, mom helped me plan my teal (the color of ovarian cancer awareness) and black wedding in New York City and in February 2013 stood by my side as my matron of honor.  

Over the next 6 years, mom endured continuous chemotherapy treatments, participated in a number of clinical trials and multiple surgical procedures. While we may have had short periods of remission, her cancer always returned.

This past year was the most difficult in her journey–mom lost a significant amount of weight and developed complications from radiation. Multiple hospital stays later, her doctors recommended that the best way to get her stronger for any future treatment would be for her to enroll in hospice care. I was full of hope during this time. After only 6 days in hospice care, my mother passed away in July after a 9-year valiant and courageous battle. She was surrounded by her family at home and I feel privileged to have been holding her hand as she took her last breath.

I was super close to my mom and I miss her every day. By telling her story, I am able to work through my grief. I carry her in my heart and she lives on through me and my children. Now that I have a daughter of my own, it is important to me to educate women about this disease and empower them to be their own advocates by listening to their bodies. While there is no reliable detection test for ovarian cancer, the best thing women can do for themselves is know the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer, be informed about their family health history, and talk to their doctor about their individual risk level for ovarian cancer to develop a personal health plan that is unique to them.

My mom was such a generous and openly warm woman and I know her hope today would be that through sharing her experience with ovarian cancer, other women will be informed of its symptoms and path so that it could lead to more early detection and increased survival. This month, and every month, I want you to #ListenUp to your body, know what normal is for you, and talk to your family to better understand your family health history. It matters.

JENNIFER LINDSAY is a Bright Pink Education Ambassador. You can get in touch with her at [email protected]

 

Community, Early Detection, Personal Stories

“She taught me to #ListenUp to my body.”

From my pre-school to preteen years, every day ended with a school bus ride to my grandparents’ house–though we just called it “grandma’s house” back then.

My favorite hour of the day was hearing the garage door rumble, and the screen door creak, and seeing my grandma stroll in with a hug and a tray of something sweet. She’d fill up the cookie jar, change out of her hospital clothes, and lay on the couch to relax with us.

One day, from the couch, my grandma pointed to the basketball hoop outside her window where my brother was playing, and told me I should try out for the 4th grade basketball team.

Some personality traits skip generations. My grandma, born in 1932, had always wanted to play sports. She had a badass scar on her leg from a bicycle kickstand, and her fervent loyalty to Minnesota Vikings football made me imagine her as a 1940s teenager running routes at a school recess she probably never had. Looking back, I’m amazed at how that one, simple sentence of encouragement launched ten of the most formative years of my life, on the court.

Shortly after my basketball tryout, I was riding in the backseat of my mom’s car when she told us devastating news. My grandma had noticed a strange back pain, and tests showed it was actually ovarian cancer. Although they expected to beat it into remission with chemo, the chance of recurrence was high. My stomach dropped, and I hoped desperately that the diagnosis was wrong, or that she’d at least beat the odds and stay with us. I couldn’t wrap my mind around my grandma not being present for my school graduations or wedding.

The very last time I saw her, we baked cookies, and I sat next to her on her favorite couch. Inside, I knew it was time to tell her I love her. An unspoken goodbye.

After a long and brave fight with ovarian cancer, and chemo, and wigs, and scarves, and oxygen and hospital stays–I lost my grandmother in November 2005.

What I remember most about her funeral was shivering from cold and nerves at the church lectern, and my uncle saying, “the world just got a lot colder.”

Six years later, I was a college senior working an on-campus job when I got the worst menstrual cramps of my life. I headed to the campus store for medicine, but when I got close, I knew something was wrong. My cramps seized a crippling grip on my abdomen until I could barely walk. I felt nauseated, and overcome with a raging fever. I quickly ducked into the bathroom, and tucked myself away in a stall. I wondered whether I would make it out, or if I was dying. If I was dying, I knew a bathroom stall was not the best place to find help. Suddenly, I felt an inexplicable reprieve. A cool, internal sensation. And for no identifiable reason, I thought of my grandmother. I took that split second of relief to crawl out of the bathroom and ask for help before I fainted and woke up in the hospital. After a series of poor medical experiences–including doctors who laughed at my questions and told me I was probably just pregnant–I was finally diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and potentially endometriosis, too.

Some traits skip generations. I watched my grandmother listen to her body. Seek out doctors. Ask questions. And fight–with a humble, beautiful will to survive, until her very last day. And, she passed that energy down, much like her love for sports.

I fight for my health and #ListenUp to my body because I love life, just like she did. Because I want to spread warmth and empower people, like she did. Because my health matters to my family–and the family I have yet to build–just like she meant the world to us.

ALEX BLEDSOE is a writer, filmmaker and communications strategist, and the co-founder of Breaktide Productions. Alex has been recognized as a Maynard 200 Fellow and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Fellow, and was previously a guest columnist for The Washington Post, an Aspen Institute emerging writer nominee, and a Hedgebrook scholar. Previously, Alex managed public relations for Apple. She is multilingual, and earned her B.S. from Georgetown University with a degree in international politics. In 2005, Alex’s grandmother passed away after battling ovarian cancer for five years. In 2011, Alex was diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). She is an advocate for self love and practices self care through exercise, laughing, traveling and quality time with loved ones.

Assess Your Risk, Early Detection, Risk-Reduction Lifestyle

This September, We Want You to #ListenUp to Your Ovaries

Whether we recognize it or not, we are in constant conversation with our bodies. Dehydrated? Betcha have parched lips! Conquer an insanely hard workout last night? Those sore muscles sum it up perfectly. While some of these cues from our body are easier to recognize than others, let’s be real: our bodies are often the first to tell us when it is in need of some love or attention.

But, how often do we listen to our bodies when it comes to our ovarian health? When’s the last time you paused and took time to #ListenUp to what your ovaries are telling you? When we know that 1 in 75 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in her lifetime and the 5-year survival rate can be greater than 92% when detected early, there is no time like the present to get up close and personal with our ovaries and ovarian health.

This Ovarian Cancer Month, Bright Pink wants you to tune in and #ListenUp to what your ovaries are telling you! We want to empower you to be your ovaries’ best advocate by knowing the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer, feeling confident in knowing your body, and collecting your family health history to better understand your individual risk level for ovarian cancer.

We know what you’re thinking, “Okay, I know I need to #ListenUp to my ovaries, but what do I #ListenUp for?” We have answers. While many of these signs and symptoms can be confused for common menstrual or digestive issues, it’s important to stay in tune with your body and take note of any changes. If these signs or symptoms persist or worsen for 2-3 weeks, see your doctor as ask: “Could it be my ovaries?”

Primary Symptoms

  • Pelvic or abdominal pain
  • Needing to urinate urgently or often
  • Prolonged bloating
  • Difficulty eating/feeling full quickly

Secondary Symptoms

  • Fatigue
  • Upset stomach or heartburn
  • Back pain
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Menstrual changes

Join us all month long in sharing these signs and symptoms with the women you love so they can also #ListenUp to their bodies. We will also be doing some exciting things on social (think: female-inspired playlist to bounce to all month long) in addition to sharing personal stories from amazing women in our network about their experience with ovarian health and cancer. Be sure to follow us on Facebook (@BrightPink), Instagram (@BeBrightPink), and Twitter (@BeBrightPink) and use the hashtag #ListenUp to stay as up-to-date as possible! 

Fueling our Mission

2017 Year In Review


This year, Bright Pink…

  • celebrated our 10th Anniversary,
  • launched our first ever monthly giving program, FundHER,
  • celebrated mom by having a meaningful conversation about health history with #GoAskYourMother,
  • drove thousands of women to schedule their annual well-woman’s exam on #CallYourDoctorDay,
  • taught tens of thousands of women the symptoms of ovarian cancer and to be #OvarianSelfAware,
  • inspired thousands of women to enroll in mobile breast health reminders #LivingMyBreastLife,
  • armed women with the questions to ask their family about health history on Thanksgiving with a #ThanksgivingGamePlan,
  • and partnered with generous supporters and sponsors to make it all possible.

As the year comes to a close, join us in reflecting on all we’ve accomplished since Bright Pink was founded in 2007. To date…

Thank you for your commitment to our work, for your belief in the power of personalized prevention, and for helping shape a brighter future – one in which every woman knows her risk for breast and ovarian cancer, and takes action to manage that risk proactively.

With gratitude,
Katie Thiede, CEO
Katie Thiede, CEO

Remember, if you haven’t yet made your 2017 tax-deductible contribution to support our work, now’s the time! Visit http://BrightPink.org/Donate to give today.

Community

Pink for a Purpose by CME Group

CME Group takes supporting Bright Pink to a whole new level through multi-office activation, department fundraising competitions, educational workshops and more! Through a meaningful corporate donation and creative employee fundraising, they’re on track to make a gift of $160,000 to Bright Pink in 2017 through the annual Pink for a Purpose campaign. We sat down with Kristin Wood, Senior Director, Internal Communications and Community Relations at CME Group, to learn more about this best-in-class corporate partnership.

PS: Your company can make Bright Pink’s mission a part of company culture, too! Learn more about becoming a sponsor today. 

Tell us a bit about CME Group, the Foundation, and your philanthropic priorities?

Giving back to the communities in which our employees and clients live and work is important to CME Group.  We are fortunate that so many of our employees, as well as members of our larger exchange community, share our commitment to give back and support our charitable initiatives.  The CME Group Community Foundation, which focuses on helping with education, children in need, and health and human services is an important part of our philanthropic efforts, and it is through the Foundation that we make our corporate donation to Bright Pink and match donations made by our employees.

Why Bright Pink?

Managing risk is our business, and we appreciate that Bright Pink has made it theirs, too. As the only national non-profit focused on the early detection and prevention of breast and ovarian cancer, Bright Pink is meeting an important need for the at-risk community.  Knowledge is power, and Bright Pink is empowering young women across the country to live proactively at a young age.  That is a cause we are proud to stand behind.

What activities take place at the office or elsewhere during the campaign?

We host kickoff receptions in each of our offices, which is a fun way to celebrate the campaign results from the prior year and get everyone excited to start again.  In addition to our corporate fundraising page, we also have a number of employees with personal connections to the cause who make their own fundraising appeals.  Their efforts have been a big boost to us and also reinforce just how many people’s lives have been affected by breast and ovarian cancer.  While fundraising is important, we also want to educate our employees about the risks associated with these cancers.  We partner with Bright Pink to host Brighten Up Workshops at our offices each year, which have been well attended and received.  For us, it comes down to raising money and awareness.

What has been the most creative department fundraiser? The most successful?

This year, our Corporate Marketing & Communications Division is hosting a “Pink Pong Tournament”, which is a clever spin on our pink for a purpose theme to raise money for the cause.  Our Legal Department has been a phenomenal supporter of the campaign, sponsoring a bake sale for the past two years that has raised more than $6,000. The effort has even gone global, with our Bangalore office sponsoring a fair to celebrate the Diwali holiday with all proceeds benefiting Bright Pink. These are just a few examples of the enthusiasm the campaign has generated among our team.

How has this partnership impacted CME Group employees personally?

One of the most meaningful aspects of our campaign is a “Share Your Story” feature on our company intranet.  We’ve had a number of employees open up about what the fight against breast and ovarian cancer means to them personally.  Across our fundraising pages, you see messages being added to donations to honor colleagues, friends and family members who have suffered from breast and ovarian cancer.  This cause really hits home for our employees, which makes it even more of a priority for us.

What advice do you have for others organizing corporate philanthropy?

First, you have to pick a cause that you believe in and that you know will resonate with your community.  Then you have to find the right partner.  Bright Pink has been amazing to work with and really responsive to our needs.  But above all else, you have to be creative and give everyone a chance to get involved, whether that’s through fundraising or donating, or even just becoming more informed about the cause and why it matters.

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