Community

National Call Your Doctor Day Is Today!

The following post was originally featured by our friends at Aerie, who are proudly teaming up with Bright Pink to support Call Your Doctor Day.  See the original post here. 

Call Your Doctor Day is today, June 13th! Aerie is teaming up with the non-profit Bright Pink to remind YOU to take a minute TODAY and schedule your yearly checkup. Need some encouragement? We talked to Dr. Deborah Lindner, OB/GYN and Bright Pink’s Chief Medical Officer, about why it’s so important to see your doctor every year and what to expect from your appointment. Read on to find out why you should take charge of your health and call your doctor!

Call Your Doctor Day With Bright Pink

Why should women go to their doctor every year?

DL: Seeing your doctor or other primary care provider once a year is one of the most important actions you can take for your breast and ovarian health. I remind women that even when you feel healthy you still need to go. It’s important for you and your doctor to have an understanding of what healthy means for you specifically. It’s your baseline.

What if I’m nervous or uncomfortable about going?

DL: That’s natural! But don’t let it stop you from taking care of your body. I encourage women to see their annual exam as this one day a year that you have a partner in managing your health. National Call Your Doctor Day is all about getting up the motivation to call and put your health first. It’s important to find a provider that takes time to answer your questions and makes you feel comfortable. And don’t forget that it never hurts to get a second opinion.

What should we know before our appointment?

DL: It’s helpful to come prepared with your questions—ask us anything, we’re here to work with you—so you can walk away with a more personalized plan to manage your risk for cancer and other diseases. I recommend taking the AssessYourRisk.org quiz by Bright Pink to get a comprehensive report on your baseline risk for breast and ovarian cancer that you can print and bring to your appointment.

Also, it’s helpful to keep track of any changes in your body, specifically in your breasts, or changes to your menstrual cycle or digestive system. If anything has persisted for longer than 2 weeks, bring this to your doctor’s attention.

What should we expect when we’re there?

DL: A well woman exam should include a clinical breast exam, where your healthcare provider will feel your breasts with their hands. It should be thorough, cover all the breast tissue, and typically last several minutes. If your doctor offers this exam, say yes—and if your doctor doesn’t bring it up, make sure you do.

Your provider will also perform a pelvic exam where he or she will actually feel your ovaries to see if there is anything abnormal. During your pelvic exam, you may also receive a pap smear. It’s important to note that a pap smear checks for cervical cancer – not ovarian cancer.

As an OB/GYN, what is your biggest piece of advice for young women?

DL: You’re your own best health advocate. Be confident and take charge of scheduling your appointment. Let Bright Pink help you – join us and Aerie on June 13th  and make the call. Get all the resources you need by visiting CallYourDoctorDay.org.

Through 2017, all annual well woman exams are covered by insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

 

Bright Pink founder, Lindsay Avner with Education Ambassadors Cailtin Lopez and Brittany Whitman
Personal Stories

A Bright Pink Education Ambassador’s Story: Caitlin Lopez

Interested in making a difference in the lives of young women? Become a Bright Pink Education Ambassador or PinkPal today. Read on for Cailtin Lopez’s story.

In my family, the only known case of breast cancer was my maternal grandmother when she was around 50 years old. She had a single mastectomy with no reconstruction and that was it. However, my gynecologist advised that I should consider genetic testing because of my family history of other cancers. My mother was tested first and when she received her results I immediately went in for testing. It was then that I discovered I am BRCA+.

I met with a genetic counselor and we discussed all of my options for prevention and early detection such as surveillance, medications, and surgery. She also introduced me to Bright Pink and suggested their PinkPal program which matches young women who are at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer with fellow high-risk individuals. I immediately reached out and received a PinkPal. I was partnered with a wonderful woman who had been in my exact situation. She helped me feel confident, answered all of my questions, and made me feel at ease.  Cailtin Lopez with her Bright Pink T-shirt

After my PinkPal helped me realize that I would be OK, I made a decision and a life plan of what I would do in regards to my BRCA+ status; I went through with surgery. After I recovered, I decided I was ready to support others.  

I received a PinkPal in 2013 and I became a PinkPal in early 2014. It was important for me to provide that comfort for other women that my PinkPal provided for me. It’s nice to know that you have a support group when you’re going through something that affects your life so much.

I wanted to continue my journey of volunteering with Bright Pink so I attended Bright Pink University, a training program for volunteers, in the summer of 2014. There I learned how to present the Brighten Up Educational Workshop, which is a 30-minute presentation that covers the basics of breast and ovarian health, introduces the idea of different lifetime risk levels, and provides early detection and prevention strategies.

Completing Bright Pink University was one of the greatest things I have ever done. Not only has it been beneficial for me, but for others in my family and community as well.

I remember being nervous while waiting to present my first Brighten Up Workshop. It was at St John’s University in Queens. The group was really positive and asked lots of great questions.  I’ll never forget that group – and I have educated new groups at St John’s University every year for the last three years. They always welcome me with open arms.    

Being informed is an important factor in order to be in control of your health.  I am honored and happy to be a part of an organization, like Bright Pink, that helps empower people to be proactive and teach them to take knowledge and turn it into something wonderful.

Caitlin Lopez after presenting a Brighten Up Workshop

While a goal of mine is to educate as many women as possible, I’m a huge fan of smaller groups too, because women (and men) tend to ask more questions, share their stories, and feel more connected. I love the feeling of helping women understand that they have control over their health and can choose to be proactive.  

Empowering women is something I am truly passionate about.

Becoming a Bright Pink ambassador has empowered me and I love the fact that I can help people dig into their family history and question their doctors. I always want to help others, especially women, and Bright Pink helps me accomplish this. My own family health history and personal genetics push me to help others realize that they are in control of their health and they don’t need to be afraid of their genetic testing results. I want everyone to know they can help themselves and their families and choose to be proactive.

 

Caitlin was inspired to volunteer with Bright Pink because of her genetic testing journey and her drive to empower others.  Find out how you can make a difference in the lives of young women. Become a Bright Pink Education Ambassador or PinkPal today.

 

 

Risk-Reduction Lifestyle

This Mother’s Day #GoAskYourMother

Bright Pink is committed to helping you become your own best advocate for your health. There are many things you can do to protect your health and discussing and understanding your family health history is one that is extremely important. Mother’s Day is Sunday, May 14 and Bright Pink wants you to #GoAskYourMother about your family health history.

Breast and ovarian cancer are often linked in families, collecting your history can help you understand where you fall on the risk spectrum.

1 in 8 women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime and 1 in 75 women will develop ovarian cancer. If there’s family history of these cancers the risk could be higher. Having one first degree relative with breast cancer can increase risk by twofold. Also, a genetic predisposition can increase breast cancer risk to up to 87% and ovarian cancer risk up to 54%.

We want you to use this Mother’s Day as an opportunity to begin an important dialogue with Mom (and ask Dad, too!)

Don’t know where to start? Bright Pink has you covered. In an effort to get this important conversation rolling we created a Family Health History form.

Help us spread the word! Snap a picture with Mom, tag Bright Pink, and use the hashtag #GoAskYourMother on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Visit GoAskYourMother.org for more details.

Happy Mother’s Day!

 

 

Carrie's family
Personal Stories

“My mother’s strength inspired me to face my fears”

On January 29th, 2007, my mom sat my brother and I down and gave us some news that would change all of our lives. She had breast cancer. She said everything was going to be okay, it wasn’t going to be a big deal, and she wasn’t even going to lose her hair.

Then her doctors found more cancer. Ultimately, she was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer which had spread from both breasts to her lymphatic system. After a fierce, courageous, and exhausting battle with chemo and radiation, the removal of her breasts and ovaries, and finally reconstructive surgery, my mother is incredibly blessed to be cancer free, a fate that not many stage 4 patients achieve.

Even after dealing with everything she did, my mom is still incredibly full of life. She is loving, considerate, and loves to be around family and friends, whether it be getting together for a holiday or just to watch the latest season of The Bachelor.

After my mom reached 5 years cancer-free, I was under the impression that the impact that cancer had on my life would finally be a thing of the past. This was until I went to my school’s health center freshman year of college and the doctor asked about my mom’s cancer, specifically whether she had a genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

It was in that moment that the doctor hijacked a conversation that my mom had been preparing to have with me for 5 years.

As it turned out, my mom did test positive for genes that are correlated with breast cancer, meaning that I also may have these same genes. It has taken me quite a while to process this information and what it could mean about my lifestyle and my health. For years, I’ve been too scared to do genetic testing. The initial fear came from the shock of learning that my mom had the gene.

I have grappled with the idea of genetic testing for a while and have now decided that I am ready to accept the results, regardless of what they are.

This summer I set a goal: I would run the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon to show myself that I can live the healthy lifestyle that I would need if I found out I have the genetic predisposition (but even if I don’t, it’s always good to be healthy!) Once I complete the marathon, I will do the testing.

I have wanted to run the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon ever since my senior year of high school. It has always been an influential part of my upbringing, whether it be by cheering on my father while he ran when I was a kid, or volunteering as a high school student giving water to the thousands of runners who passed in front of me. After four years of volunteering at the race, I decided that it’s finally time to run the race myself.

I knew I wanted to run for charity and the first organization I looked at was Bright Pink. I immediately knew it was the one for me, not only because of my family’s experience with breast cancer, but because Bright Pink’s mission is so aligned with my own beliefs and experience.

I want to empower young women by sharing my story and my journey while preparing for the marathon and show the importance of living a healthy lifestyle and being proactive to prevent breast and ovarian cancer.

To be honest, I’ve been afraid of getting genetic testing done since my mom’s diagnosis. But her strength has inspired me to take the necessary steps to be proactive about my health. Running a marathon won’t be easy, but I know that once I’ve finished it, I’ll feel strong enough to take on whatever comes next.

 

 

Carrie was inspired to change her lifestyle and learn more about her genetics because of her mother’s cancer diagnosis and genetic predisposition. This Mother’s Day, #GoAskYourMother about your family health history and learn more about genetics at ExploreYourGenetics.org.

Katie Thiede, the new CEO of Bright Pink on Friday, April 14th, 2017. Photos by Jasmin Sh
Community

Bright Pink Welcomes Katie Thiede As New CEO

Bright Pink is proud is to announce that we have named a new Chief Executive Officer, Katie Thiede, a tireless advocate for women’s health.

In January, founder Lindsay Avner announced she would be moving to a new role as Chairman of the Board and launched a national search to find a visionary new leader to grow Bright Pink into the next decade. Katie was selected from a competitive slate of candidates and will begin her new role on May 8.

“I am thrilled that we have found everything we were searching for in our new CEO, Katie Thiede. She’s bold, tenacious, big-hearted and an incredibly visionary leader for Bright Pink. As I transition to my new role as Chairman of the Board, I will be working closely with Katie to ensure her transition is a complete success.” – Lindsay Avner

Katie has dedicated her entire professional career to serving organizations that serve others. Most recently Katie has served as Vice President of Development for Planned Parenthood of Illinois, where she has more than tripled annual philanthropic revenue to over $12 million in just four years, led the Illinois affiliate to become among the most successful affiliates in the nation, and led several cross-functional organization-wide strategic initiatives. Katie has also served as the Executive Director of the Chinook Fund in Colorado, where she set the strategic direction of the organization, and previously held leadership roles at the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Rape Assistance and Awareness Program, and Clean Water Action.

“My drive and entrepreneurial spirit are rooted in my true love of what I do and who I work beside and it is a privilege to bring this passion to Bright Pink. Like so many, my life has been touched profoundly and deeply by breast and ovarian cancer and Bright Pink’s mission and message is empowering and makes the opportunities for impact limitless.”- Katie Thiede

A passionate women’s health advocate, Katie is eager to help all women live their best lives by honing Bright Pink’s areas of expertise and inspiring life-long health behavior changes for millions. She is looking forward to expanding Bright Pink’s network of dedicated partners and donors to fuel exponential growth and impact.

As Bright Pink charges into its second decade under Katie’s leadership, we are poised for significant growth as a top breast and ovarian health organization with extraordinary reach and life-saving impact on women nationwide.

We could not be more excited to be embarking on this new chapter with Katie at the helm! Join us in welcoming her over the coming weeks.

Here’s Katie’s vision for Bright Pink in her own words:

Commit to supporting Bright Pink during this exciting phase of growth. By becoming a FundHER, your monthly investment will drive initiatives such as educational programs for young women, digital resources, health provider training, and community support. Become a FundHER today.

Assess Your Risk on smartphone
Community

Bright Pink + The Effies

At Bright Pink, we know that the work we do is powerful and life-saving, so it’s always great to be recognized for it. The campaign for our state-of-the-art digital tool, AssessYourRisk.org, was selected as a finalist for a Health Effie! The Effies recognize, “effectiveness in marketing communications, spotlighting marketing ideas that work and encouraging thoughtful dialogue about the drivers of marketing effectiveness.”

Bright Pink was selected as a finalist for “Too Important to “Go Viral” – Using Facebook Ads to Drive Predictable, Repeatable Impact” for Bright Pink in the category of Disease Awareness & Education: Advocacy.

AssessYourRisk.org is proving not only to be a life-saving tool, but the campaign surrounding it is being recognized as the very best in terms of effectiveness, and lets us know that our life-saving message is reaching an audience and inspiring people to actually take action. We’ve had over 80,000 people complete Assess Your Risk so far just this year, thanks in large part to strategic Facebook Ad campaigns created in partnership with our friends at Craft and Commerce.

What’s “AssessYourRisk.org?”

Understanding your risk is one of the most powerful things you can do today. AssessYourRisk.org is a digital tool to help you determine your personal level of risk for breast and ovarian cancer. It’s an online quiz comprised of 19 questions about family health history, personal health history and lifestyle factors.

“The work Bright Pink is doing is tremendous. I sent Assess Your Risk to my entire family and they were all blown away. It started a great conversation about breast cancer and prevention measures.” – Elizabeth M.

The quiz itself takes less than 5 minutes to complete and provides you with a customized assessment of your baseline risk for breast and ovarian cancer. You’ll learn what factors are working for you and perhaps those that aren’t benefitting you  You can print your results or even email them directly to your health care provider, all in an effort to begin or enhance conversations during your well-woman’s exam.

“Bright Pink provides a “report card” of sorts that tells you what factors are working in your favor so you don’t panic or feel helpless, then lists modifiable risk factors – things you can do to lower your cancer risk. I came out at “potentially high risk” and was advised to see a doctor or genetic counselor to confirm that your baseline risk truly is only increased, and not actually high. I appreciate the qualifiers.” – Ricki L, PhD

We are so honored to be selected as a finalist for a Health Effie award because of our efforts promoting AssessYourRisk.org. It’s just more reassurance that we’re on track to keep educating women and inspiring them to turn awareness into action. Now it’s back to work, because we’re not done saving lives yet!

Gina and Melissa
Personal Stories

“My sister was always there to help me, but now I had to be strong for her”

My sister, Melissa, is my best friend. I’ve always looked up to her and followed in her footsteps. As the oldest of four (we have two little brothers), she would always be bossing us around at home. I was like her little sidekick who would do whatever she wanted, no matter what. She always let me tag along with her friends and in high school I was always known as “Melissa’s little sister,” not Gina. Growing up, we were inseparable and would say to each other, “what do other girls without sisters do all day?”

On September 2nd, 2016, Melissa was diagnosed with breast cancer. She was 31 and had discovered a lump while breastfeeding.

“The doctor told her it was probably nothing, but she had a gut feeling and went back a couple of weeks later to do more testing.”

Melissa decided to advocate for her health, and she found out that she had 100% estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. When Melissa noticed the lump in her breast, we all told her it was nothing. She was persistent that something wasn’t right, but even when we were waiting on the results I didn’t think it was going to be cancer. So when she was diagnosed, we were all in a state of shock and disbelief.

“I always heard about this happening to other people, and older women. Not my family. Not my sister. Not someone who is only 31 years old.”

Gina’s sister, Melissa, remained strong during chemotherapy

Melissa went for her surgery about two weeks after being diagnosed, just 10 days before her son Niko’s first birthday. My mom took off work to go stay with her in New York to help with the baby. We all celebrated his first birthday while she had tubes hanging from her chest. Two days later, we found out that Melissa’s cancer had spread to one of her lymph nodes. It was devastating because we knew this meant that she needed further treatment.

After we got this horrible news, the roles that we played for each other as sisters switched. I was on the phone with her every day on my drive home from work. Building her up, giving her advice.

“She was always there to give me advice and help me, and now I had to be strong for her. I didn’t want her to know how scared I was, too.”

This journey has been so hard for all of us, but the worst part was waiting for the doctor visits. It was not knowing the plan of treatment and the fear of the unknown. She went to several doctors who were suggesting very aggressive chemotherapy treatments. She got several opinions and finally she decided to go with a milder form of chemotherapy.

After watching her endure chemotherapy every two weeks for the past few months, I am excited to say she finished her last treatment in February! We are all so excited to see her chemotherapy coming to an end and are hopeful for the future.

“To anyone who is dealing with something similar, know that this is only a temporary part of your life. Imagine yourself beyond the cancer. You will laugh again. You will get through this. This is not what defines your life.”

Melissa during her final chemotherapy session

Watching my sister go through all of this really made me want to do something more. Something that could help other women and prevent them from going through everything Melissa has. She has been so strong through this long and trying process. That’s what inspired me to take on running my first marathon, and do it on Team Bright Pink.

“To all the young women out there who think that it won’t happen to you: assess your risk. Don’t be afraid to ask your doctor about your risk. Get checked, be breast self-aware, and let your doctor know if something doesn’t feel right. Don’t wait.”

I was introduced to Bright Pink a few years ago by a friend. After my sister was diagnosed I took advantage of the amazing tools that Bright Pink provides, like AssessYourRisk.org, and educated myself as much as I could. This experience really opened my eyes to how many young women are diagnosed with breast cancer. I think it’s so important that Bright Pink is so focused on educating women about breast and ovarian health at a young age. I wouldn’t wish this experience on anyone else. I am so grateful that I still have my confidant, best friend and partner in crime here with me.

Melissa’s strength inspired Gina to run a marathon and help Bright Pink save women’s lives from breast & ovarian cancer. If there’s someone in your life who inspires you to be strong, visit TeamBrightPink.org to find out how you can dedicate your life-saving run in their honor.

Risk-Reduction Lifestyle, Video

What I Ate In A Day (to reduce my risk of breast & ovarian cancer)

 

What I Ate In A Day (to reduce my risk of breast & ovarian cancer) from Bright Pink on Vimeo.

Who knew that reducing your risk for breast and ovarian cancer could be so delicious? Bright Pink team member Cavya does, and she’s sharing her mouth-watering recipes below!

Bright Pink Smoothie Bowl

This super tasty smoothie bowl is a breeze to whip together and will probably make your Instagram dreams come true. And if that’s not enough to sell you, nutrient-packed ingredients like berries, tropical fruit, and flax seeds can help you lower your risk of breast and ovarian cancer. What more could you want?

Ingredients

  • Smoothie
    • ½ cup frozen strawberries
    • ¼ cup frozen raspberries
    • ½ cup greek yogurt
    • ½ cup almond milk
  • Toppings
    • ½ cup mango chunks
    • 2 tbsp unsweetened coconut flakes
    • 1 tbsp ground flax seeds
    • ¼ cup raspberries

Directions:

Blend together frozen berries, greek yogurt and almond milk into a thick smoothie. Pour into a bowl and top with the remaining ingredients. Feel like a goddess of health and wellness.

Vegan Lentil Curry with Brown Rice

This quick and simple curry packs in tons of protein and flavor and is the perfect go-to for #MeatlessMondays. Consuming high amounts of red meat has been proven to increase your risk of breast cancer, so cutting down whenever possible is always a great idea. Plus, a ton of these ingredients are on our cancer fighting grocery list

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp of fresh, minced ginger
  • 1 jalapeño, diced with seeds removed (optional)
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 dried red chili pepper (optional)
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tsp whole or ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp curry powder
  • 1 cup red lentils, rinsed thoroughly
  • 1 can light coconut milk
  • 2 tomatoes, diced
  • 2 cups baby spinach, roughly chopped
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup brown rice

Directions:

Cook brown rice according to package directions. In a medium saucepan, saute onions, garlic, ginger and jalapeño in olive oil until soft. Add in spices (mustard seeds, dried chili, turmeric, cumin and curry powder) and let them toast for about 30 seconds. Add in diced tomato, coconut milk, water, salt, pepper and lentils, simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are soft and fully cooked. Add in baby spinach and stir. Serve over brown rice garnished with cilantro, a lime wedge, and a side of your favorite veggie.

We know you’ll love these delicious, risk-reducing recipes. If you try them out, make sure to post your finished product on Instagram and tag @BeBrightPink so we can ❤️️  your pic!

Personal Stories

“Running together is our therapy. Now we’re saving lives, too.”

I first heard about Bright Pink in 2007, when my mom was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. She mentioned her symptoms to her doctor (urinary changes, extensive bloating and feeling full), and he sent her home with heartburn medication. Sadly, she passed away two years later when she was only 56.

Bright Pink had fallen off my radar in recent years, but I got reacquainted in October 2016 when my cousin was hosting a KEEP Collective event. She knew my passion for breast and ovarian cancer education and invited me to partner with her in an online party where some of the KEEP items would go to benefit Bright Pink. While she showcased the sparkly goods, I used Bright Pink’s educational materials to teach the women in the party about their health.

Reconnecting with Bright Pink last October pushed me to get really familiar with Bright Pink’s education resources, and I was impressed.

Bright Pink is doing a great job putting out ready-to-share, useful resources, and that’s something I wanted to support.

I’m an avid runner, so joining Team Bright Pink for the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon seemed like a natural next step!

After I made the decision to take on running and fundraising for Team Bright Pink, I decided to take the challenge one step further, and convince my friends to join me! Luckily, my friends don’t take much convincing! We all met each other through a running group, and running together is our sure-fire way to see each other. It’s our weekly therapy session and our excuse to travel together. I knew Kristin hadn’t done the Chicago Marathon yet, and I told her years ago I’d do it with her. I texted her and Nicole to see what they thought, and, by the end of the day, Renee and Diana had signed up too.

I have incredible friends. Even without having substantial ties to breast or ovarian cancer, or any awareness of Bright Pink, they jumped right in and pledged to fundraise. Just like that!

It isn’t always easy to stay motivated to train for our runs, and to be honest, we don’t do “motivation” very well. We’re great at complaining, whining, cussing and plotting how to get out of the next race. Despite that, we’re all running obsessed and will sign up for another race as soon as someone sends out a text.

I am so thrilled to be taking on this challenge with all my best friends for Bright Pink. I see it as my duty to educate my family and friends about ovarian cancer and listening to their bodies, so everyone has a better chance of an early diagnosis. Running the Chicago Marathon on Team Bright Pink is a way for all of us to spread Bright Pink’s life-saving message to even more women.


Are you inspired by Amy and her amazing friends? Join Team Bright Pink for the 2017 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, or one of many other races!

Early Detection, Risk-Reduction Lifestyle

Why you shouldn’t wait to call your doctor this month

The New Year might mean plenty of things for you. Maybe this is the year you read more, the year you stick to your exercise routine, or the year you treat yourself. But one action you definitely have to take is scheduling your annual well-woman exam. This check-up is a major component in your breast and ovarian cancer prevention and early detection strategy.

Even though Bright Pink’s official Call Your Doctor Day isn’t until June, why not get a jumpstart to 2017 and begin maintaining your breast and ovarian health by calling this month? After the influx of December patients, January is pretty calm at your OB-GYN office, so you might see your doctor in a few days rather than a few weeks. Here are some tips for calling the office to set up your appointment:

  • Call closer to the beginning of the month. The end of the month gets hectic at the OB-GYN when birth control prescriptions tend to run out and patients need refills ASAP. Avoid getting crowded out by last-minute appointments and call early in the month.
  • Schedule your appointment around popular days and time slots. The most popular days to visit the OB-GYN are Tuesdays and Thursdays, and the most booked times (daily) are 9 a.m., 10 a.m., and 2 p.m. Unless you need to see your doctor at these times, be flexible with the receptionist.
  • Prepare for your visit. Another part of the new year for you might include insurance turnover, so make sure you have your updated info for the receptionist when you arrive (and arrive early!). To calm your nerves for the visit, print out and bring a copy of “5 Questions to Ask Your Doctor” so you know what to talk about. You can also discuss the results from Bright Pink’s Assess Your Risk tool if you take the quiz beforehand.

It takes the same amount of time to call your doctor as it does to brush your teeth — so do both today! (Just not at the same time.)


Bright Pink is dedicated to empowering young women to have life-saving conversations with their doctors about breast and ovarian health. Learn more about how to foster this positive relationship at BrightPink.org. And don’t forget your printable guide on what to ask your doctor.

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