Assess Your Risk

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National Society of Genetic Counselors Approved

Do you Know Your Risk for Breast and Ovarian Cancer?

This interactive tool was created to take you on a journey and help you better understand some of the common factors that can influence your personal cancer risk. By combining your family's health history and accounting for lifestyle factors, you will not only learn more about your risk, but also what actions you can take starting today to be brighter with your breast and ovarian health.

Disclaimer: This tool is available for educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as medical advice. Be sure to partner with your medical provider to develop the best personal care strategy for you.

Read Quiz Overview

The Assess Your Risk quiz is a tool to guide you through a series of questions about your health and family history. Your answers will be tallied at the end of the quiz, where you’ll be given information and advice to help you better understand your risk factors.

Throughout the quiz, you’ll also see a series of lifestyle questions. You’ll be given tips immediately based on your answers, to help you improve or maintain your healthy lifestyle.

Assess Your Risk Now
1/15

Have you or any of your immediate family members (parent; sibling; grandparent; aunt) had any of the following...

  • Breast cancer diagnosed at age 50 or under

  • Triple negative (ER/PR/her2-) breast cancer

  • More than one breast cancer (cancer in both breasts, or two separate breast cancers in one breast)

  • Male breast cancer

  • A genetic mutation that increases breast cancer risk (Ex. BRCA1/2, PTEN, p53)?

  • None of the above

Your BMI is within the healthy range as established by the National Institutes of Health.

By maintaining a healthy weight, you are taking one of the most important actions to reduce your risk. Fatty tissue produces excess estrogen, high levels of which have been associated with an increased risk of breast, endometrial, and some other cancers. Continue to make a commitment to yourself by eating healthy, exercising regularly, and check out our recommendations for living a healthier lifestyle.

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2/15

Is your body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 - 24.9?

(Not sure what your BMI is? Calculate it here!)

Your weight may be increasing your risk for breast and ovarian cancer.

Fatty tissue produces excess estrogen, high levels of which have been associated with an increased risk of breast, endometrial, and some other cancers. That’s why maintaining a healthy weight is one of the most important actions you can take to reduce your risk.

Make a commitment to yourself to eat healthy and exercise regularly. Check out our recommendations for living a healthier lifestyle.

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3/15

Have you or any family members had ovarian cancer?

Yes
No

Drinking more than one alcoholic beverage per day may be increasing your risk for cancer.

Studies have shown a link between alcohol consumption and several different types of cancer, including breast cancer. Stay on the safe side and either limit your alcohol (that includes beer, wine, and liquor) intake to one drink per day or eliminate it completely.

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4/15

Do you drink more than one alcoholic beverage per day?

What a bright choice.

Limiting your alcohol intake is one way you are proactively managing your cancer risk. Studies have shown a link between alcohol consumption and several different types of cancer, including breast cancer. Continue to be bright by limiting your alcohol (that includes beer, wine, and liquor) intake to one drink per day or eliminate it completely.

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5/15

Within one side of the family (both on mom’s side or both on dad’s side), is there breast cancer and one of the following cancers?

  • Ovarian cancer

  • Pancreatic cancer

  • Thyroid cancer

  • Uterine cancer

  • Sarcoma cancer

  • Leukemia or Lymphoma

  • Melanoma cancer

  • Adrenocortical Carcinoma

  • Stomach cancer

  • None of the above

  • Brain Cancer

Research suggests that smoking

may increase the risk of breast and some ovarian cancers. Commit to quit and take charge of your health today

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6/15

Do you smoke?

Living life as a non-smoker

is another way you are being proactive with your breast and ovarian health, as recent research suggests that smoking may increase the risk of breast and some ovarian cancers. It is not known whether second hand smoke exposure is associated with these cancers, but the possible link is a reason to avoid second hand smoke, too.

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7/15

Do you have a relative with both breast cancer and one of the following cancers?

  • Ovarian cancer

  • Pancreatic cancer

  • Thyroid cancer

  • Uterine cancer

  • Sarcoma cancer

  • Leukemia or Lymphoma

  • Melanoma cancer

  • Adrenocortical Carcinoma

  • Stomach cancer

  • None of the above

  • Brain Cancer

You are reducing your risk

of developing breast cancer by exercising regularly for 30 minutes or more on most days. Plus, you are lowering your risk for heart disease and reducing stress. Keep it up, and know that establishing this habit at a young age is the best way to set yourself up for a healthy adulthood.

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8/15

Do you get an average of 30 minutes of physical activity at least five times a week?

Regular exercise for 30 minutes

or more on most days can reduce your risk of developing breast cancer. Plus, regular exercise has many other benefits such as reducing your risk for heart disease as well as stress. A great way to start making exercise part of your daily life is to do things you already enjoy that involve physical activity. Explore creative ways to get moving such as dancing with your girlfriends or taking a walk around the neighborhood after brunch!

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9/15

Are you of Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jewish ancestry with breast, ovarian, or pancreatic cancer in the family?

Yes
No

By limiting your fat-intake,

you are reducing your risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Research shows a modest decrease in invasive breast cancer for women with a low-fat diet. In addition, studies show that following a low-fat diet for at least four years is linked to a lower risk of ovarian cancer. Continue to fill your plate with more fruits and veggies and less red meat in an effort to reduce your cancer risk, and download our Cancer-Fighting Foods Shopping List for more healthy meal ideas.

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10/15

Do you follow a diet that’s low in fat and includes a mix of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy products, and lean proteins?

You can reduce your cancer

risk by filling your plate with more fruits and veggies and less red meat, and limiting your fat intake. Studies show that following a low-fat diet for at least four years is linked to a lower risk of ovarian cancer. Research also shows a modest decrease in invasive breast cancer for women with a low-fat diet.

Start small by adding cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli and cauliflower, to your salad, and topping your fat-free yogurt with antioxidant-rich fruits, like fresh blueberries. Download our Cancer-Fighting Foods Shopping List to get started!

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11/15

Did you receive any radiation to the chest during childhood to treat Hodgkin’s disease, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, or another cancer?

Yes
No

You might be surprised

to know that there are benefits beyond pregnancy prevention for taking the pill. By taking oral contraceptives for five years in your 20s and 30s, you can cut your risk of developing ovarian cancer by up to 50%. This is a simple way to reduce your risk for the deadliest gynecological disease.

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12/15

Have you taken oral contraceptives (birth control pills) for five years (does not have to be consecutive) during your 20s or 30s?

Taking oral contraceptives

for five years in your 20s and 30s can cut your risk of developing ovarian cancer by up to 50%.

The decision to take birth control pills is a very personal one, and—as with any medication—there are risks as well as benefits. Some studies suggest that current use of oral contraceptives may slightly increase the risk of breast cancer, especially among younger women. Talk to your doctor about how to best balance the risks and benefits of oral contraceptive use.

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13/15

Do you have one or more immediate family members (parent; sibling; grandparent; aunt) that have had breast cancer at age 50 or older?

Yes
No

The hormonal changes that occur

during pregnancy may influence your chances of developing breast cancer later in life. Be sure to discuss factors like the age at which you first gave birth and the number of children you’ve had with your doctor. It is possible to develop breast cancer during pregnancy, and it is often diagnosed at a later stage because your breasts are possibly larger, more tender and lumpy. Pregnancy may reduce your risk for ovarian cancer, and breastfeeding for at least one year has shown to protect against breast and ovarian cancers. Consider breastfeeding to reduce your risk, remember to be breast self-aware, and be sure to speak up if you notice any changes in how your breasts look or feel.

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14/15

Have you ever been pregnant?

If you are thinking of having children

in the future, be sure to discuss these plans with your doctor so they can advise you on the hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy and help you better understand the link between pregnancy-related factors and breast cancer. These hormonal changes make a woman’s breasts larger, more tender and lumpy, which may be why breast cancers that develop during pregnancy tend to be diagnosed at a later stage. Remember to be breast self-aware even during pregnancy, and be sure to speak up if you notice any changes in how your breasts look or feel. In addition, consider breastfeeding, as breastfeeding for at least one year has been linked to a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

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Being in the know is always in style!

By knowing what’s normal for your body you can better detect if something doesn’t feel right. Be sure to take action if any of these symptoms present themselves by bringing them to the attention of your doctor. Keep these great reminders on hand to remember what you should be monitoring on a regular basis.

Complete
15/15

Do you know the signs and symptoms of breast and ovarian cancer?

Time to Brighten Up!

From plucking eyebrows to walking in heels, there are some things a young woman just needs to know. This includes the symptoms of breast and ovarian cancer and knowing what’s normal for your body. If you notice any changes that persist over time, talk to you doctor.

Download our breast and ovarian self-awareness cards, and start being proactive with your health today.

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Awareness to Action

1. Download, save, print & bring your results to your doctor.
PDF
2. Spread the word & share this tool with friends and family!

Results

***Other factors related to your personal health history may also affect risk and are not accounted for by this tool. These factors may include previous breast biopsy, having dense breasts, having your first menstrual period under the age of 12, or giving birth for the first time after the age of 35. Be sure to discuss your personal health history with your doctor so together you can come up with a plan to proactively manage your risk.